Riserva di

Cremona

Riserva di

Cremona

As Good as it Sounds

A delicate town on the edge of Lombardy, Cremona is famous for its musical culture. The birth city of famous violinist and master luthier Antonio Stradivari, Cremona safeguards its melodious heritage with numerous fairs and museums dedicated to the fascinating world of music and instruments. All this playing obviously makes the city’s musicians hungry, and Cremona offers them delicacies such as the sweet torrone and the characteristic fruit mustard, a must when visiting the city!

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  • Culture
  • Food & Wine
  • Craft
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Antonio Stradivari

The Father of Modern 
Strings

Antonio Stradivari

The Father of Modern Strings

The city of Cremona is renowned for its musical heritage, especially its link to some of the most talented luthiers in history. 

Of these, Antonio Stradivari (1644 - 1737) is perhaps the most widely known figure. Born into a notable Cremonese family, Antonio studied violin-making, becoming an apprentice under Nicola Amati - another great luthier of Cremona - at the age of 12. However, some believe Stradivari simply started out as woodworker, never working as a true apprentice under Amati; this theory could be confirmed by the elaborate carvings on some of his later instruments.


Out of approximately 1000 instruments crafted by the artisan, only 650 survive today and around 500 of these are violins.

Few people know that alongside violins, Stradivari crafted other string instruments, such as harps, cellos and guitars. These instruments are commonly referred to by the Latinised form of his surname, Stradivarius.


The oldest surviving Stradivari violin dates back to 1666, and is the earliest historical testimony available of his creator.

If you are curious to learn more about this distinguished master luthier, you must pay a visit to the beautiful museum erected in his name. 

Stradivari’s house and workshop, situated on Corso Garibaldi 57, are also open to visits upon request, while the luthier's body is buried in the Church of San Domenico.

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Pulling strings

Cremona's Master Luthiers

Pulling strings

Cremona's Master Luthiers

If you are looking to learn more about luthiery and have already been to the Cremona’s violin-orientated museums, we recommend stopping by a master luthier’s workshop to get a closer look at the craftsmanship involved. 

Among Cremonese master luthiers is Philippe Devanneaux, whose workshop can be visited on request. Philippe also offers the chance to have a private concert from a violin or cello player. His workshop is in the centre of Cremona, in Via Sicardo 12/a, not far from the Violin Museum.


Another great workshop is Trabucchi, where the owner makes violins, violas, cellos and double basses, as well as repairs and restores ancient instruments. In his strive for excellence and perfection, the workshop only creates 15 instruments per year. If you want to sneak a peek, Trabucchi is located in Via Bella Rocca 14, also in the centre of the city.


Atelier Ferron is also a wonderful discovery, Valerio Ferron being one of the youngest and most talented master luthiers in Italy. You'll find the award-winning maestro in Largo Boccaccino 14, close to Cremona's main square (Piazza del Comune).

While in the area, you must also take a look at the Bottega dell’Archetto, a shop dedicated to bows (and cleverly named ‘Bowtega’).

Entrance is free and there you will find a small museum containing information about the traditional bow-making technique, preferred types of wood and their differences, work tools, horse-hair and intriguing facts about ancient bows.


Most of these skilled craftsmen have their shops along via Robolotti, so if you happen to take a stroll in the area make sure you walk through this particular street. In general, Cremona's streets and smaller alleys are alive and bustling with musical culture and fine craftsmanship; stroll along the city's streets and tiny shops will surprise you with their heritage.


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Never Enough Nougat

Torrone di Cremona

Never Enough Nougat

Torrone di Cremona

For those of you with a sweet tooth, Torrone is Cremona’s delicious answer to your sugar-cravings. 

A Christmas classic, but popular throughout the year, torrone is eaten all over Italy. 

Ancient texts have demonstrated that this delicacy was consumed as long ago as the Roman age and its name actually derives from the Latin torrēre, meaning ‘to toast’ or ‘to burn’.  This likely referred to the toasting of the almonds and hazelnuts, which form two of its staple ingredients, along with egg whites, honey and sugar.


Torrone is traditionally very hard, but in recent years the soft version has become increasingly popular. The difference in consistency is mainly due to the time difference in cooking – hard torrone requires up to 12 hours, whereas soft torrone needs only 2 hours. 

If you can't get enough, try the modern variants on the recipe, which often include chocolate, orange and macadamia nuts, as well as raisins and candied fruit in general. 


If your teeth are ready for a challenge and you find yourself in Cremona at the end of autumn, you must pay a visit to the annual Festa del Torrone. In Cremona during another time of the year? Fear not! Torrone is so popular that you'll find it in almost every local pasticceria.We recommend you try two Cremonese institutions when it comes to sweets: the historical pastry shops Dondeo (via Dante 38) and Ebbli (via Cavallotti 5) are sure to not disappoint. Although they run an artisanal production and don't necessarily sell torrone all year round, their vintage interiors and incredible atmosphere are worth the visit!

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Salame, Cremonese Style

Salame di Cremona

Salame, Cremonese Style

Salame di Cremona

If you know a bit about Italy, you will surely have noticed that every region, city and sometimes even town has its own typical wine, cake and type of pasta.

The same goes for cold cuts and the city of Cremona is no exception.

The Salame di Cremona is a traditional affettato (‘cut’) made of ground pork meat, seasoned with black pepper and aromatised with garlic.


Its origins date back to 1231, when documents attest to the abundant commerce of cold cuts between Cremona and her neighbouring regions. 

Today, the Salame di Cremona must be produced under strict procedures, as it is on the list of Italian IGP products. 

The ‘Indicazione Geografica Protetta’ label certifies that the product has been produced in a specific area and under strict standards. Once ready, the salume (no, it’s not a typo for salame, it's another word for cold-cut in Italian!) is aged for a certain period – this can range from the minimum of 5 weeks to the more average 4 months. 


Whatever your personal taste, salame di Cremona is a niche product to try before leaving the city of strings!

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A Pear-Shaped Cheese

Provolone Valpadana

A Pear-Shaped Cheese

Provolone Valpadana

If you are in Cremona and are looking to try A local cheese, there is a specialty you can’t miss out on: Provolone Valpadana.

Provolone Valpadana is a sweet, pear-shaped and delicately flavoured cheese that becomes spicier as its curing progresses.

Its first official records date to 1871 but it is widely accepted that the general production of cheese in the area between the Ambro and the Adda rivers began much earlier.

It is thanks to the Cistercian monks, who carried out impressive works to re-channel water from the above two rivers, if today the sought-after and loved Provolone exists. Thanks to them, cereal-livestock production became possible in the lower Milanese countryside, later spreading to the whole of the Po plains.


The traditional pear shape with its knob-head and big size distinguishes the Provolone Valpadana from all other cheeses. 


At the beginning of the 19th century, the spun paste culture from southern Italy encountered the dairy tradition which had formed in the lower Milanese, gradually giving birth to what today is known as Provolone Valpadana. This cheese's shape is in fact possible thanks to the whole-milk pasta filata (spun paste) used to produce it. 

A curiosity: used for other typical Italian cheeses, such as mozzarella and scamorza, the pasta filata technique has its origins in the Middle Ages.


Traditionally, Provoloni were hung to dry from the wooden beams of local farms, preferably in a dark but airy place.

This avoided the formation of mould and gave the cheese a more decise flavour, depending on the amount of time it was left to age. 


Today, the cheese is protected by a designated consortium. 

Provolone Valpadana is available at local markets but if you'd like to visit a certified producer, visit the official site of the 'Consorzio Tutela Provolone Valpadana', where all producers are listed. You can book a tour through the consortium or by directly calling your favourite producer.

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An Octagonal Masterpiece

Cremona's Baptistery

An Octagonal Masterpiece

Cremona's Baptistery

With its striking style and beautifully frescoed interiors, the Baptistery of Cremona is considered one of the best examples of Romanesque architecture in Europe.

Annexed to the city's cathedral, the building has a beautiful octagonal plan - a reference to Sant'Ambrogio (the patron saint of Milan), symbolising the eighth day of Resurrection and Baptism. 


The Battistero was constructed in 1167 - at the time, the adjoining cathedral hadn't been completed yet.

Originally built in terracotta, the north and northwest sides of the baptistery were subsequently covered in marble to harmonise its appearance with that of the nearby cathedral.

Many artworks are treasured inside the octagonal-shaped building, including Baroque altars - among which the multi-colored sculpture by the Cremonese carver Giacomo Bertesi -, the baptismal font in marble made by Lorenzo Trotti in 1531, the sculptural works coming from the nearby Cathedral and the magnificent bronze statue of the Archangel Gabriel.

The building also features a majestic vault, which has been a source of inspiration over the centuries for many artists and architects and consistently leaves visitors with a sense of awe.

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A Symbol of Prestige

Palazzo Trecchi

Palazzo Trecchi's 15th century interiors are fit for a prince - indeed, the building housed many important figures of the Duchy of Milan.

16th Century Frescoes

San Sigismondo Church

One of the finest examples of 15th century Mannerism of Northern Italy, the monastery displays fine frescoes from a number of different artists.

A Renaissance Gem

Palazzo Fodri

One of the most beautiful examples of Renaissance architecture in Cremona, Palazzo Fodri's beauty culminates in two 15th century frescoed rooms.

Museum or Church?

San Lorenzo Archeological Museum

Inside the San Lorenzo Church lies an impressive archaeological museum which treasures Cremona's history.

A Symbol of Prestige

Palazzo Trecchi

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16th Century Frescoes

San Sigismondo Church

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Palazzo Fodri

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Ancient Walls, Modern Pride

Castelponzone

Ancient Walls, Modern Pride

Castelponzone

The rich history of Castelponzone can be traced back to the 15th century, when the town was considered the commercial and social center of the Ponzone family’s fiefdom. The name Castelponzone derives from the historical name Il Castelletto since the town was built around a stately fortress. Ponzone, instead, is to reflect the name of the family that governed the area.

The Ponzone family would remain powerful and influential until 1842, when the last descendant passed away. Eventually, after the unification of Italy, the Ponzone family properties were sold off to different buyers.


The area remained autonomous until 1934, when it became part of the larger city of Scandolara Ravara. However, despite this bureaucratic change, Castelponzone has managed to stand on its own and has not lost any of its former glory. 

Thanks to the hard work and dedication of Castelponzone’s mayor and alderman, the town is now officially listed as one of the Borghi più belli d’Italia (Italy’s most beautiful villages). For the citizens of the area this recognition confirms what the residents have known for centuries.


When you make the trip to visit Castelponzone we would like to suggest a few of the must-sees to make the most of one’s visit and to enjoy everything the area has to offer. For history buffs, a not-to-miss spot is Antiche Mura (the ancient walls of the city) as well as the Museo dei Cordai (the Rope Makers Museum) which tells the story of the lost art of rope making and its role as the main activity of Castelponzone. Two other must-sees are the famous churches of saints Faustina and Giovita.

After taking in all the history and beauty, the other ‘musts’ are the local culinary specialties (we are in Italy, afterall!).

Castelponzone boasts some unique dishes such as tortelli di zucca con sugo rosso ai funghi chiodi (pumpkin tortelli with red sauce and wild mushrooms), marubin con crema di lambrusco (a filled pasta similar to cappelletti with a creamy sauce made with lambrusco) and, diet permitting, you can go whole hog: there’s the salame del borgo. This local salami uses the entire pig with a surprisingly excellent balance between the lean and fat content.

Castelponzone is more than just another small, antique village. It is the preservation of the excellence of the past combined with the passion and pride of today – go see for yourself!

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Ancient Chimes

Cremona's Belltower

Ancient Chimes

Cremona's Belltower

Just next to Cremona's cathedral is the Torrazzo, bell-tower and symbol of Cremona's landscape as well as eye-catching architectural beauty in the charming Piazza del Comune.

Standing at more than 112 metres high, the Torrazzo is the third tallest brick bell-tower in the world.

The tower’s impressive height was originally recorded in ‘arms’ and ‘ounces’ – the ancient Lombardese measuring system – and is still announced on a plaque at the base of the building. 


On the fourth floor of the tower lies the largest astronomical clock in the world: dating back to the 16th century, it is painted to represent the sky and the zodiac, as well as the Sun and the Moon.

Although popular tradition believes that construction on the tower began in 754, construction actually began in 1230 and continued until 1309.

The Torrazzo underwent, in fact, four different construction phases: the first brought the construction up to the third dripstone, the second - which took place between 1250 and 1267 - up to the dripstone under the quadriphore and the third phase, which saw other generic works.

Finally, the last phase brought the Torrazzo to completion and saw the addition of the marble spire.

The seven bells of the Torrazzo are tuned in the scale of A major, and date back to the 18th century. An eighth bell, called 'The Bell of the Hours', is also present, and tolls a different note. 

Keep your ears ready while strolling along Cremona's streets; the bells don't play often as unfortunately the tower is unstable. If you do hear their sound, as they are maybe tolling for a special occasion, consider yourself lucky!

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When Music 
Runs in the 
Family

Nicola Amati

When Music Runs in the Family

Nicola Amati

Less known than Stradivari, but often even more appreciated by connoisseurs, is Cremonese master luthier Nicola Amati. 

Coming from a respectable Cremonese family dedicated to violin-making, Nicola made several valuable contributions to the development of violin-craft

The originality of his designs, characterised by elegant lines, mathematically derived outlines and the amber, transparent varnish he used has come to be known as the 'Grandi Amati pattern'.


Today, of all the Amati family violins, Nicola’s are the most suited for modern playing. 

Nicola, also known as Nicolò, was the first in his family to break from tradition and take apprentices from outside the family, ensuring that his knowledge was passed on and methods emulated. 


Some claim a link between Stradivari and Amati that goes further than their mutual profession in Cremona.

Based on the label of a 1666 Stradivarius reading Alumnus Nicola Amati, some believe that Stradivari worked as an apprentice under Amati, learning the art of luthiery. 

There is, however, not enough evidence to prove that Stradivari was ever Amati’s pupil.

If you're curious to learn more about Nicola and the Amati family violins, you can find some extremely rare pieces on display at the Violin Museum, situated in Piazza Marconi 5, Cremona.

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If God Made Instruments

Bartolomeo Giuseppe Guarneri

If God Made Instruments

Bartolomeo Giuseppe Guarneri

A key figure in the Cremonese history of luthiers is Bartolomeo Giuseppe Guarneri, widely considered to be one of the finest violin-makers of all time, along with Stradivari and Amati.

Guarneri’s violins were markedly different to contemporary models, making them easily recognisable today. 


His violins were labeled with the acronym ΙΗΣ (iota-eta-sigma of the Greek alphabet), a shortening of the Greek ΙΗΣΟΥΣ, meaning ‘Jesus’. It is from this signature that he gained his distinct nickname, del Gesù.

Coming from a family of luthiers, Guarneri had a very personal instrumental style.

His instruments have their own, individual characteristics which set them apart from other Guarneris.

Collectors often argue as to whether Stradivari's instruments or Guarneri's are better; Del Gesùs (as Guarneri's masterpieces are often called) usually feature a darker, more profound sound than Stradivari's. 

Because Guarneri's carreer was so short (under 25 years of activity), not many instruments survive to this day and their scarcity has made prices sky-rocket.

In addition to this, Del Gesù was a very creative luthier and loved to experiment new styles in arching, f-holes and other design details; because of this, his instruments are among the most copied of all time, making the market very reactive when a certified Guarneri instrument is for sale. 


If you're looking to make up your mind on who is the greatest luthier, go see for yourself. Guarneri's own and family instruments can be found at the Museo del Violino, located in Piazza Marconi 5.

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A Job that's not Money for Old Rope

Castelponzone’s
rope-making tradition

A Job that's not Money for Old Rope

Castelponzone’s rope-making tradition

Castelponzone is an ancient village not far from Cremona and Parma, famous for the production of handmade ropes. For two centuries, until the outbreak of World War II, Castelponzone was a major centre for the processing of hemp, from which ropes were originally made. Hemp was later replaced by sisal, a cheaper and widely available fibre extracted from a species of agave native of Central America, the agave sisaliana.


The necessary raw material, provided by the rich local landowners, was distributed to every household, with the amount depending on the number of family members. Villagers were asked to process the hemp and deliver the ropes, so that they could be sold to merchants in Parma, Cremona and other cities. They were paid by the unit and their scant income barely allowed them to survive.


The production process involved the entire family. The father would do the hardest jobs (twisting and braiding) while children and women were responsible for spinning the wheels and combing the fibres.

Today only a handful of old rope-makers survive in the village, as cordage is now industrially produced from synthetic fibres. Thanks to the Museo dei  Cordai, opened in Castelponzone in 2014, the hard work of generations of rope-makers will not be forgotten. This little museum provides information about the history and techniques of rope-making and hemp production in the area.




A visit is well worth-while and will give you an idea of how hard life was for these otherwise forgotten daily heroes. The following lines from a poem by a local artisan are the best way to try and imagine the hardships of these families, whose lives were at the mercy of their rich landlords:

Tante volte anche col freddo la gente sudava
prima di presentarsi al padrone che l'aspettava
e se dopo la consegna fosse andato tutto bene
quella povera gente dimenticava le sue pene

So many times did they sweat even when freezing
Before appearing in front of the lord who was waiting for them
And if, after delivery, everything was well
Those poor people forgot all their pain

The museum is open April to October on Sundays and holidays 15.30 to 19.00.


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An Unforgettable Sound

Cremona's Violin Museums

An Unforgettable Sound

Cremona's Violin Museums

If you have been in Cremona for an hour or more, you will know that its violin-making heritage is hugely important to the city and its inhabitants. Even if classical music isn’t your ‘forte’, a trip to Cremona compels a visit to the city’s two main museums dedicated to the history and art of luthiery.


The first museum, Museo del Violino, stands in Piazza Marconi and exhibits a wonderful collection of some of the most precious string instruments of all time. 

While inside, don’t miss the huge violin-shaped auditorium and the interactive sound demonstrations.



The second museum is the Museo Stradivariano, located in Palazzo dell'Arte on Via Ugolani Dati. On display are Stradivari, Guarneri, Amati and Sacconi, as well as other famous instruments. If you’re lucky enough, you might hear these precious instruments' voice while played by Maestro Mosconi and Maestro Accardo.


Most of these famous instruments are, in fact, played on a daily basis to make sure their sound doesn’t deteriorate over time due to non-usage.

Another fact to take note of is that every year in fall, Cremona hosts the Stradivari festival, named in honour of the world-famous violin maker Antonio Stradivari. A couple of days completely dedicated to music and concerts, the festival has grown since its first edition and also features workshops and music-based activities for children. If you’ve got flexible dates, don’t miss out on it.

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Small Town, Big History

Torre De’ Picenardi

Small Town, Big History

Torre De’ Picenardi

Torre De’ Picenardi, Li Tùr in Cremonese dialect, is a small town in the province of Cremona that includes four smaller hamlets: Pozzo Baronzio, San Lorenzo De’ Picenardi, Cà De’ Caggi, and Canove de’ Biazzi and all together they make up an area that is rich in history and longobardo nobility.

For visitors the options of how to explore the area are varied since there are many guided tours as well as planned itineraries available for anyone keen on cycling. How you move around is up to you but there are some main points of interest not to be missed whether you are on foot, two wheels or four!


First up is Villa Sommi Picenardi: former residence of the Picenardi family, the castle was built in the 19th century over a pre-existing 13th century stronghold. The castle features two magnificent gardens, one in Italian style and another one in English-style.

Next is the Castello Di San Lorenzo; located in a 50,000 m² park, it was once just a simple group of fortified houses. It then underwent many renovations, the most important one during the 19th century. In 1829 the façade was restyled to reflect a medieval influence whilst the interior would retain its neo-classical elegance. San Lorenzo Castle is considered to be the largest castle in Cremona if not the largest castle in the entire region of Lombardy.


At the end of Via Cavour you will find the former residence of the Vesconi family, also known as “Il Villino”.

The building features beautiful Doric columns and unique gardens. In addition there is a hill featuring a Doric temple dedicated to Priapus - the god of fertility - and on a second hill there is a round building dedicated to Castor and Pollux, the symbols of brotherly love in Greek mythology.


Torre De’ Picenardi is a small town where rich history and timeless beauty give us the chance to stop and marvel at the wonders of the past. If you’ve got an afternoon on your hands and you’d like to spend it in the countryside, make sure not to miss this small wonder!

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Cremona's Stuffed Pasta

Marubini

Cremona's Stuffed Pasta

Marubini

A classic pasta filled with meat and boiled in three different broths, marubini are roughly the equivalent of Emilia Romagna's tortellini - but don't say this to a Cremonese!

Also called marubèen in local dialect, marubini are traditionally served during special occasions such as weddings, family gatherings and Christmas banquets of the Cremonese area.


To make traditional marubini, the first step is preparing the filling.

Veal is marinated with vegetables such as carrots and onions for a minimum of 10 hours. The meat is subsequently boiled together with the vegetables until cooked.

Put in a pan to simmer with sage and butter, the veal is then left to cool. Once cold, it is ground and combined with herbs, salt and pepper. Fresh pasta is prepared and the filling evenly distributed in small mounds. 

Once cut, the fresh pasta is folded around the filling and the small marubini are made.


These are then cooked in a typical broth just before being served. The combination of the three different meat broths - which all require a different cooking - is claimed by some to be the real secret to these Cremonese delights. 

Available in traditional restaurants all year round, marubini are a must-try. Especially loved during the colder months of the year, they are a true relish after hours spent exploring the city's streets!

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Holding Strong

The Hamlet of Pizzighettone

Holding Strong

The Hamlet of Pizzighettone

Located in the Val Padana and gracefully set along the Adda River, the small  hamlet of Pizzighettone still stands in much of its original Medieval splendour. Back in its heyday, it was a vital stronghold and refuge which grew and developed under its various rulers over the centuries: the lordships of Cremona, the Visconti and Sforza families of Milan, the Spanish, the French, the Venetians, the Hapsburgs, the Bourbons, the Savoy and, last but not least, Napoleon. Just to name a few.


What makes Pizzighettone and the village of Gera unique (but we’ll get to Gera in a bit) is that their ancient walls and fortifications dating back to the Middle Ages are still intact and in their original form.

One example is what is known as the Cerchia Muraria which is a circle of fortified walls and the most well-preserved in all of Northern Italy. It is a rare example of a military fortification built during the Middle Ages and was continuously updated and improved between the 16th-19th centuries.


If look you around the historic downtown (although it would be pretty hard to miss!) you will see the Torre del Guado which stands as the official landmark of Pizzighettone.

The tower was born as a defensive stronghold and even served as a prison when Francesco of Valois was imprisoned there in 1525. It is also interesting to note that the tower and the city walls remained on “active duty” until 1867 even after the unification of Italy.

On the other side of the Adda River is the tiny village of Gera. Just like Pizzighettone, Gera still stands in much of its original glory.

The bell tower of the Church of San Rocco is still in place and just beyond the bridge lies the heart and old soul of the village: the houses of the borgo.


Just as the Torre del Guado is to Pizzighettone, Gera also has its landmarks to boast: The Parish Church of San Bassiano which dates back to the 12th century and the town hall which dates back to the 15th century. 


As an extra interesting note and another example of the tenacity of Pizzighettone and its surrounding area, in 2014 the Piccolo Dizionario del Pizzighettonese was created as a way of preserving and safeguarding the local dialect; pizzighettonese.

Thanks to the efforts of its creators and members of an online community, not only are the buildings of the area still holding fast, but the locals intend protect their culture just as relentlessly.

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Romanesque Beginning, Mixed Ending

Cremona Cathedral

Romanesque Beginning, Mixed Ending

Cremona Cathedral

When in Cremona, spare some time to visit her architectural beauties, such as the city's Cathedral and Torrazzo (bell tower).

Construction of Cattedrale di Santa Maria Assunta began in the early 12th century, but works were interrupted and the building damaged by a strong earthquake, leading to its completion in 1160-1170. 


Built on the highest point of the city, the cathedral was originally conceived in Romanesque style.

However, following a number of renovations, Gothic, Renaissance and Baroque elements were added. Inside, important works of art are displayed, including 14th century frescoes depicting the Stories of Abraham, Isaac, Jacob and Joseph. The most important figurative complex of the cathedral is the fresco decoration on the side walls of the nave (early 16th century), portraying the Life of Mary and Christ.


The cathedral's beautiful façade is in Romanesque style and, along with the adjoining baptistry, it is widely considered to be among the most important buildings in Europe built in this fashion. 

It features a beautiful portico and is surmounted by a large rose window. On its side are the figures of the Four Major Prophets, each bearing a roll with the text of their prophecies.


While at the cathedral, make sure you pay a visit to the adjoining Battistero di Cremona and the Torrazzo - symbol of the city.

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Not as Sweet as
it Looks

Mostarda di Cremona

Not as Sweet as it Looks

Mostarda di Cremona

When in a restaurant around Cremona, beware of innocent-looking, brightly-coloured fruit in syrup. What you probably have in front of you is a local specialty called Mostarda di Cremona. 

It is, technically, fruit in syrup, but heavily spiced with mustard seeds!

Mostarda di Cremona is commonly used in local cuisine to accompany meat (the classical 'bollito misto', for example), just as you would do with regular mustard. The sweetness of the fruit complements the pungent taste of the mustard seeds, giving the combination a particular aromatic twist when compared to traditional mustard.

The compote’s history is said to have its roots in the monasteries of the lombardese countryside, where the monks would treat the fruit with mustard seeds to preserve it during the long winters.

The colour of the fruit is beautifully preserved - but don't be fooled by its looks!


If you are feeling courageous, take a very small piece – as you might do with the Japanese wasabi – and accompany it with your main dish. If you are feeling really daring, place it on a piece of bread and go for it!

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Cremona's Torrone Fair

Festa del Torrone

With hundreds of interpretations of the city's classic nougat, the Fiera del Torrone takes place in Cremona each year in October.

Cremona's Tribute to its Greatest Luthier

Stradivari Festival

Every year, in fall, Cremona opens its doors to musical enchantment, celebrating the city's musical heritage.

A Homage to Cremona's Mostarda

Mostarda di Cremona Fair

A playful-looking fruit mustard, Mostarda di Cremona has a very spicy character... taste for yourself!

Cremona's Torrone Fair

Festa del Torrone

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Cremona's Tribute to its Greatest Luthier

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A Homage to Cremona's Mostarda

Mostarda di Cremona Fair

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